Homemade Ricotta Cheese

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Homemade Ricotta cheese is so much fun to make!  And honestly, it really does taste so much better than what you buy at the store.  It’s so sweet, creamy, and very delicious.  It doesn’t take any special cheese-making equipment or supplies and takes less than 15 minutes of hands on time.  It would be a great project to do with your kids.  They love watching the milk suddenly separate into curds and whey!

Join me over at Keeper of the Home where I’m sharing about how to make your own Homemade Ricoatta Cheese.

 

Comments

  1. Wow! Can it get any easier? We’ll be giving this a try next time lasagna is on our menu. Blessings, ~Lisa

    • Mindy says:

      Yum, Lisa! That sounds great! I hope you enjoy making the ricotta – there is something so satisfying about it :-)

  2. Yolanda says:

    This is a very very nice tutorial! I have made fresh ricotta with our raw goat milk and we love it. Sometimes I press it into a bowl when it is still warm, cover and chill, and then we can slice it, too. I also have vacuum packed it (i.e. Food Saver bags) and it freezes and keeps for a LONG time.

    • Mindy says:

      That’s good to know Yolanda. I’ll have to try vacuum packing and freezing it – great idea!

  3. This looks great. I never knew that it was that easy. I’m going to try it.

    I’m a new follower, I just came from Miz Helen’s Full Plate Thursday.

    Please stop by when you have a chance.

    Thanks for sharing,
    Joanne
    http://wineladycooks.blogspot.com
    Winelady Cooks recently posted..Coconut and Chocolate Chip Cookies

  4. Christy says:

    This might be a silly question – but can I use pasteurized milk and cream? I don’t have access to raw milk.
    Christy recently posted..Hearth and Soul Hop 46

    • Mindy says:

      Hi Christy! Not a silly question at all, and yes, you can use pasteurized milk and cream. Actually, even if you did have raw milk, this would not be a raw cheese because of the temperature that you have to bring it up to.

  5. Christy says:

    thank you – I must give this a try now!
    Christy recently posted..Hearth and Soul Hop 46

  6. I love this post! I’ve been planning to make cottage cheese soon… I love the bit about your hubby’s t shirt! Thanks for linking up to Friday Potluck!
    Erin @ EKat’s Kitchen recently posted..Friday Potluck 32

  7. Miz Helen says:

    Hi Mindy,
    I am so happy to have this recipe, it just looks awesome. I will be trying it very soon. Thank you so much for sharing with Full Plate Thursday and hope to see you next week!
    Miz Helen recently posted..Swiss Strips

  8. Melody D. says:

    I’ve actually made ricotta a couple of ways; the whey method and this one. I really only use the whey method after making mozzarella. I’ve been working my way through my cheese book since we brought home our dairy goat a couple of weeks ago. I just fumbled my way today though cottage cheese- nearly ruined it but it’s still sort of cottage cheese (it tastes like it but the curd is too soft- my rennet is old so thats my guess as to what went wrong). I still have a lot to learn and it’s certainly easier to brave the more difficult cheeses when you have a steady milk supply available to play with.

  9. What a timely posting! Have you tried this with soured milk? I have two gallons that have gone sour that I’m looking for something to do with.
    Tracey @ Good Life Menus recently posted..Menu for The Week of May 7- 2011

    • Mindy says:

      I have never tried this with soured milk before Tracey, but I don’t see why it wouldn’t work. I do know that ricotta tastes and smells like the milk that it is made from. So if you use sour milk, it would most likely just have a different taste compared to ricotta made with fresh milk.

      Let me know if you try it and how it turns out.

      • Deanna says:

        I make a “cheese” for my lasagna using sour milk. I simply put the milk into a pan and heat it. As it heats it separates beautifully, then I drain like you mentioned above. I don’t use the cream, because I am always trying to get rid of sour milk when we have had our fill of pancakes and scones. It does freeze well. I think yours would taste better, and will try the salt. But since we are always using the cheese in a sauce, it absorbs the flavour of the white sauce, or the other ingredients that I throw in.

  10. This tip just made my day! I’ve never tried my hand at making cheese, but this looks easy enough :) Thanks so much for sharing this today with Kitchen Tip Tuesday!

  11. I’ve been making lots of yogurt lately with gallons of milk in our fridge (my little ones don’t like to drink it much, but love to eat other dairy products), and I’m looking forward to making the ricotta. Thank you for the recipe!

    Blessings,
    Michele
    Michele @ Frugal Granola recently posted..Against the Grain Cookbook Giveaway

    • Mindy says:

      Hi Michele! We don’t drink a lot of milk either – we mostly just use it to make kefir or yogurt and sometimes cheese. :-) I hope you enjoy the ricotta!

  12. You know, I have made ricotta cheese with the by-product of making 30 min. mozzarella and the process was very similar only of course it wasn’t whole milk ricotta at that point. I will give it a try this way because it looks like the yield is much higher.
    Jennie@ Pure Homemaking recently posted..Liberating French Fries

  13. Linda says:

    That’s looks wonderful! If I was eating dairy, I’d definitely be trying this. Thanks for participating in Gluten-Free Wednesdays!
    Linda recently posted..Amazon Sale on Gluten-Free Foods

  14. Rachel says:

    So is the leftover whey usable, say in smoothies? While I love ricotta I’d hate to lose all those valuable minerals and nutrients.

    • Mindy says:

      Hi Rachel! The leftover whey from the ricotta is considered an “acid” whey, which is different than the “sweet” whey that you get from yogurt or kefir. It has a more tangy taste than sweet whey, and it does not have any beneficial bacteria like the whey from yogurt. I have never tried it in my smoothies before, because I usually use the whey I get from my kefir (or yogurt). I have used it in baked goods and homemade bread before with good success though! It wouldn’t hurt to try it in your smoothies and see what you think! Let me know how it goes if you do.

    • Rachel says:

      Of course, I wasn’t even thinking about the fact that once heated that high it would be devoid of the good bacteria. But I’m assuming that like sweet whey it would still contain many of the minerals from the milk. Hmm, not sure vinegar-based whey would go over well in the smoothie :) If I make the ricotta I’ll definitely taste the whey and see if it’s compatible with smoothies. Otherwise I’ll have to find some other places to sneak it in.

  15. Diana says:

    Question —

    Can the whey be saved for other uses like I do when I make greek yogurt/yogurt cheese? The yogurt whey has been cultured where this has not. But there might still be a use for this?

    I’ve been wanting to make lasagna, but ricotta cheese is just so expensive. I’m thinking this might just be a bit cheaper!

    Oh, and what kind of vinegar did you use?

    • Mindy says:

      Hey Diana! I use the leftover whey in my baking. See my comment above to Rachel for the reason why.

      It is definitely cheaper for me to make the ricotta than to buy it pre-made, and the taste and texture is SO much better.

      I use white vinegar for this recipe. You can try other acids, such as lemon juice, but I always have the best results with the white vinegar.

      Hope this helps!

  16. Teresa says:

    I just found your site today and I am definitely trying your ricotta cheese recipe soon. It is so nice to see young families eating healthy traditional foods.(My hubbie and I are in our 50s) I will be checking your site for more great recipes very often, Thank You!

  17. Katie in Ohio says:

    Hi, I just wondered if anyone has tried making ricotta with kefir in place of the milk/vinegar or buttermilk? Thanks.

  18. Shu Han says:

    that’s it? i’m definitely giving it a try!
    Shu Han recently posted..Garlic Bruschetta with Sauteed Shiitake and Button Mushrooms

  19. Amanda says:

    I just made homemade cottage cheese with Elton Brown’s recipe, wondering what is the difference between the 2 ,almost exactly the same directions except for the temp that you heat the milk (cottage @ 120, yours @185). Does that make the difference in the texture or taste?

  20. Bethany says:

    I’ve been trying to make ricotta lately and I am just not having much luck. I keep accidentally making queso fresco, which is a nice addition to some recipes, but not what I’m trying to do. My milk just never curdles all the way, then I have to add more vinegar or citric acid, and by the time I get it to curdle it’s not quite ricotta..

    Your recipe does use a little more vinegar than the ones I’ve been trying so I’ll try that out next and see if it works. I’d love to be able to make ricotta at home@
    Bethany recently posted..Foodsaver Reviews – The Foodsaver Vacuum Sealer V2840

  21. James says:

    Thanks for the excellent recipe, it’s far superior to anything in the grocery store. It’s definitely the best ricotta I’ve had while not in Italia!

  22. Marie says:

    This is the recipe I always use…always turns out great!! I also like to add Basil or Italian seasonings if using it for lasagna or something similar!!

  23. Nylark says:

    I found you through pinterest and your perfect baked potato (which we’ll be having for dinner tomorrow:) then spied your homemade ricotta (yumyum!) but I don’t see the tutorial/instructions for the cheese. Help, I really want to try it! :)

  24. DeAnna says:

    I seem to be having trouble seeing the recipe for ricotta… help!

Trackbacks

  1. [...] Homemade Ricotta Cheese @ The Purposed Heart… Yum! [...]

  2. [...] Ricotta Cheese I don’t ever buy ricotta because it’s so expensive, but if I could make it myself, we’d eat it a lot more often. [...]

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